Eastcott Window Wanderland

Eastcott Window Wanderland

March 4th 2019


How wonderful it is to be writing about Eastcott window wanderland – yet another brilliant community ‘thing’ organised by the better than brilliant Eastcott community group – based at Savernake Street Community Hall. They’re jolly good at ‘things’ it has to be said.

The Window Wanderland is the latest, super fab initiative from the Eastcott group. I’m ever in awe of what they achieve there. They are such a vibrant, imaginative and well-organised group – what they achieve leaves me impressed, breathless and exhausted in equal measure!

During the two nights of 2nd and 3rd of March, over 130 window makers dressed windows in well over fifty of Swindon’s streets and transformed them into an illuminated art gallery. Images of a small few in the gallery below.

But where did this wonderful idea come from?

The window wanderland concept began in in Bristol. Eastcott resident, Helen Ganberg spotted it there and approached the Eastcott community group to sound them out about bringing it to Eastcott.

Eastcott realised the project in Swindon with the help of a £6,500 grant from the National Lottery Community Fund. The chairman of Eastcott group, Caroline Davis-Khan told the Swindon Advertiser, that they’d worked on the project for six-seven months.

As group trustee Laura Holmes said, it’s a nice creative way to bring people together, that showed how many artistic and creative people there are around. And she’s right – there’s a staggering amount of creativity in Swindon.

To make the exhibition more inclusive, the group used the grant to set up workshops.

Mayor of Swindon Junab Ali, who was at the launch, said: “It’s a fantastic idea, this is just bringing the whole community of the area together. In some places, neighbours don’t talk to neighbours and there is no activity in the community, so this event is fantastic.

And now a few photographs purloined from Facebook (I’m a terrible photographer, trust me it’s best this way) of a small number of the windows. See also this from Swindon Viewpoint:https://www.facebook.com/SwindonViewpoint73/videos/401411213925244/

Especially for Laura Jane Lowry – her gorgeous contribution to the Eastcott Window Wanderland.

Marilyn Trew and Ruth Wintle are two super artistic ladies that run art workshops at Savernake Street Hall. Here’s the windows they all worked on:

If anything sums up the event it’s this – seen on Twitter:

To find out more about the Eastcott area, its community and history read their gorgeous book Legacy of a Rag and Bone Man.

Swindon’s Stylish Art Gallery

Swindon’s Stylish Art Gallery

As some of you will know, I’m right now embroiled in writing my second publication for Amberley Books, Swindon in 50 Buildings. You can imagine I’m sure, how much material I’m amassing. All of it fascinating and entertaining but not necessarily suitable for the book. So it’s great to have this blog as a vehicle to share some of what I can’t put in the book.

A recent visit to Apsley House, home of Swindon’s Museum and Art Gallery, to research the building for the book unearthed some wonderful details – a couple of them featured in this post.

A New Art Gallery Annexe

Photo of a model of Apsley House and the 1964 art gallery annexe.

Obviously I’m not going to reveal too much here about the building. #spoilers But I simply loved learning that, when the new art gallery annexe opened in 1964, it was furnished with tables and chairs from none other than Conran Associates. Yep – THE Conran of Habitat, the Conran Shop and more.  Before ever Ikea invaded our shores we had Conran. This was the bees knees. The last word in interior design.

These days that gallery annexe might look of its time – on the outside at least. Indeed I’m never sure how I feel about its exterior. Some days I like it and some days I don’t. But of course what matters most of all is what goes in the building. Which, as it happens, is lots. Lunchtime talks, childrens’ activities and trails, evening talks etc. You can find out what’s on at the museum here.

But the point here being that, in its day, Swindon evidently created a chic and stylish venue for its art collection. 


And on the subject of the gharial …

The Museum’s Inspiration: Charles Henry Gore F.G.S

The first honorary curator, for thirty-one years, and the man behind the setting up of the museum was one Charles Henry Gore.

Gore developed an interest in archaeology as a child. Over time he built up a collection of specimens, becoming a well-respected geologist and a fellow of the Geological Society.

Gore was awarded the Freedom of the Borough of Swindon in October 1933 – only the fourth person in the town’s history to receive such an honour. Moreover the first museum curator to be so honoured.

Charles Henry Gore dies in 1951 aged 84. He’d held an ambition to be curator at the museum until he was 90. He almost managed it.

A love of Art and Design … close to home

A love of Art and Design … close to home

Logo from the Creative Wiltshire website.
https://creativewiltshire.com

This post is by way of sharing a blog on the Creative Wiltshire website.

The blog began life as a series of Facebook posts by Carole Bent, partner in the David Bent Studio. Carole set out, in the lull following Open Studios in September, to use Facebook to celebrate some of Swindon’s artists and to showcase ‘what an artist’s wife and partner bought’.

‘The possibility of exhibiting these with a friend in a similar position was discussed, but time flew by.

In 2018, Carole decided that a positive and accessible way to share the work would be virtually, on Facebook. Her personal and positive approach aimed to brighten up the dark month of November and to help to shine a light on some of the great talent close to home.’

So the lovely blog put together by Creative Wiltshire brings Carole’s posts together with some context about Carole herself.

Some of them I know

Of course I’ve written about some of the artists Carole showcased on this blog – often several times over the years. So what follows is merely a list of quick links to those posts. But DO, DO, DO check out the full blog linked above to read about others that I’ve not covered.

  1. Tim Carroll: Posts about Tim here.
  2. David Bent: Several posts about David here.
  3. Dona Bradley – architectural illustrator
  4. Marilyn Trew – coming to this blog soon!
  5. Sally Taylor and Vicky Silver – Artsite
  6. Simon Webb: Several posts about Simon on this blog. Here’s one of them.
Dona Bradley: Architectural Illustrator

Dona Bradley: Architectural Illustrator

I have long admired Dona’s work. So when she expressed interest in having a feature in this ‘Made in Wiltshire’ section on the blog, thrilled didn’t cover it because I love her iconic Swindon images. #Obvs

 It’s a b*gger that I’m out of wall space – fridge magnets it is then! 

Images from Facebook page
Dona Bradley artist at her drawing board.

Dona at the drawing board. Photo credit: Stephen McGrath

Discouraged

Talk to many creatives of certain generations and you meet a recurring theme: that of parents discouraging their offspring from pursuing their artistic talents and aspirations. And Dona is no exception to this. She told me how, when she hit 40, she realised that the great keyboard of life had a lost chord. And that chord was her creativity, her art. So she set about rediscovering it.

From then until now, Dona’s pursued her art part-time. But January 2019 marks a new, exciting, yet scary era: that of pursuing her work full-time. She’ll be doing lots more live events, getting out and about with her art and meeting people. I think it’s safe to say the lost chord is well and truly found.

Art for Architecture’s Sake

Dona confesses to be being a closet architect. ‘If I had my time again, I’d train to be an architect’, she said. But instead, at the life point she was at when she realised how much she missed being creative, she opted to go to Bristol college and do a course in spatial design. The discipline takes into account the architectural aspects of a building and is much less about pretty colours, soft furnishings and the like.

All of Dona’s artwork now is a happy compromise for her. Specializing in buildings, her work fulfils both her interest in architecture and her desire to create. With Dona’s work, everything is about the building. What she loves is marrying a building’s beauty with the significance it holds for an individual.

The Feel Good Factor

Dona’s clients tell her stories about their experiences of a building or place – so her work helps people to feel good about where they live. Swindon is a great subject for Dona for this reason.

There’s no escaping that Swindon gets more than its share of put downs and knocks – goodness only knows why. Yet, Swindon has some wonderful, iconic buildings and structures that Dona has used in her work to great effect. For a start, my favourite David Murray John Tower has had the Dona Bradley treatment, as has the iconic (albeit neglected) diving platform at Coate Water. Aren’t they both gorgeous?!

The Town Hall with its splendid railings, our lovely Town Garden’s bandstand and Christ Church in Old Town.

 Dona’s had wonderful reactions to her Swindon pieces and endless support from lots of Swindon bodies.

The library shop in Swindon central library stock her products. As does the shop at the museum & art gallery in Old Town and the cafe in Town Gardens. 

There’s a list of places that stock Dona’s work at the bottom of this post.

Swindon Artist’s Forum and Other Support Networks

Freelancers of all kinds need support networks and, in the case of artists in particular, somewhere to try out their work in a safe environment. Dona cites Swindon Artist’s Forum as one such place. Says Dona: ‘It’s a non-judgemental gallery for all comers.’ She is also a keen participant in Swindon Open Studios, displaying her work in Swindon’s central library. Yet another group that Dona is involved in is Swindon Urban Sketchers – looking them up I find that the Urban Sketchers are an international thing with chapters all over the place – including Swindon. I rather like that.

A Swindon urban sketchbook on its way to the art library in Brooklyn, New York. Should you visit you can go take it off the shelves there and view it. How FAB is that?

Down the Motorway to Bristol

It’s obvious enough that Dona finds suitable subjects for her illustrations beyond Swindon’s undoubted charms! These are many but notably – Bristol. When she has stalls, and participates in markets in Bristol, Dona accepts their local currency the Bristol pound. Over the 2018 festive season, Dona had a blast trading in Brizzle’s own currency and collaborating with seventy other traders at the Bristol Bazaar – a fabulous pop-up shop. 

In the Ether

By now you’re surely keen to see more of Dona’s work and follow her on social media. So:

  1. The Dona Bradley drawings website.
  2. Dona on Instagram – a great way to see Dona’s work –@donabdrawings
  3. Our old friend Facebook 
  4. And the Twittersphere of course – @dona_b_drawings

Shop local. Shop Independent. It’s Just a Card – or fridge magnet … !

There’s a growing appetite for shopping locally and supporting independents. Witness the diaspora of the coffee shop for a start. And the rise of artisan everything – now there’s an overused and wrongly used word – anyway! Anyone who’s paid any attention at all to this blog will know that I’ve written ad nauseam about the importance of shopping locally and supporting small businesses. I am one after all.

And so are artists! They have bills to pay just like the rest of us. Which is why there’s a thing, a campaign, called ‘Just a Card‘. From the website: ‘The JUST A CARD campaign aims to encourage people to buy from Designer/Makers and Independent Galleries and Shops by reinforcing the message that all purchases, however small, even ‘just a card‘ are so vital to the prosperity and survival of small businesses. 

The campaign came about when Artist & Designer Sarah Hamilton saw the quote “If everyone who’d complimented our beautiful gallery had bought ‘just a card‘ we’d still be open” by store keepers who’d recently closed their gallery.’ That makes you think doesn’t it? It’s an important message – one applicable to any small business and *ahem* blog owner. So Dona, of course, subscribes to the ‘Just a Card’ campaign.

Where you can get Dona’s work – aside from her website:

  1. Swindon Central Library
  2. Swindon Museum and Art Gallery
  3. Swindon Artist’s Forum
  4. Town Garden’s Cafe
  5. Visit Bristol
  6. Clifton Suspension Bridge
Choosing your event stylist

Choosing your event stylist

Choosing your event stylist - table set ready to dine

Let’s first establish the difference between a wedding planner and a wedding and event stylist.

A wedding planner is the person responsible for every organisational aspect of your occasion. Depending on the level of service you’re paying them for, a wedding planner will, for instance, as this article in The Knot points out, help you with:

  • Setting a realistic budget for your wedding or party
  • Come up with a master plan to map out all the small details – from your music choices to your favours
  • Source venues/locations that fit your brief and budget
  • Fitting your budget, find great florists, photographers, caterers, bands and DJs and … wedding/event stylists …

… and a great deal more besides.

The Event Stylist

An event stylist  is the person that gives your venue the WOW factor. You know – that thing that makes your guests take a sharp intake of delighted breath when they walk into the room. But how to choose such a person?

NB: I’ve made a point of mentioning the word event because of course venue stylists are not only for weddings. From hatch to match and despatch – life is full of occasions that call for celebration, for rolling out the metaphorical red carpet. 

Choosing an event stylist

A wedding stylist can work absolute wonders for you. They’ll bring your vision to life in every detail of your ceremony and reception, liaising with your wedding planner should you have one, to create a cohesive story. 

Close your eyes and picture your party or wedding reception. Whatever your dream might be, from vintage tea party to winter wonderland, your event stylist will bring your vision to life.

To get your search started, Google is your friend. Browse for event styling services in your area. Check out social media too. Pinterest, Instagram and Facebook are all great places to find event stylists and to get some visuals on what they can do. Not forgetting, if it’s a wedding you want styling, wedding fairs.

Once you’ve shortlisted some stylists that pique your interest check out their websites for their portfolio and costings. When you’re satisfied on those points all that’s left then is to make appointments to see them in person. As you start to discuss with them what you have in mind, you’ll quickly be able to gauge if they ‘feel’ right to you. It’s vital that you feel confident in them and comfortable with them.

Fabulous Functions UK

Fabulous Functions UK

Fabulous Functions UK:

Where It’s All About You

Before returning to the UK, Fabulous Functions UK enhanced the events with their flair and imagination in the Caribbean, Middle East and the rest of Europe. Drawing on that experience, they now offer a tailor-made service to Swindon, to Wiltshire and much of the south-west that is gaining bouquets at every turn.

Bridebook Uk silver award

Proving that point, January 2019 saw Bride Book UK award Fabulous Functions UK a silver certificate of excellence.

In addition, they’ve been featured in Your Glos & Wilts Wedding magazine. 

Making the Mundane Marvellous

With well-chosen accessories, complementing your chosen colour scheme, Fabulous Functions UK will transform your venue and make your vision manifest. They have an ever-growing range of venue accessories for you to hire, of which the crème de la crème are their two fabulous flower walls.

So delay no more. For a celebration to remember call them now for a no-obligation chat. Telephone: 00 44 7511 842 451 or email hello@fabulousfunctionsuk.com

Check out their testimonials

From Tom Falding of Falding’s Fandangoes:

And from some jolly happy clients: