August 2020

Shaw House – Old Shaw Lane

It’s ever curious is it not – how stuff pops up on social media relevant to somewhere you’ve not long since been to? In this instance the co-incidences relate to Shaw House, on Old Shaw Lane.

I tend to think of Old Shaw Lane as being a bit of bygone Swindon. But of course it’s not – not really. Because this side of town – the western expansion – wasn’t Swindon. Back then Swindon was the settlement on the hill. Old Swindon – Old Town as we call it now.

I wrote about the western expansion where I live, in Secret Swindon. And Frances too has mentioned it in this blog post. ‘Development on the western expansion of Swindon began in the mid 1970s. First came Toothill, then Freshbrook, Grange Park (where I live) and Westlea. Shaw and Middleleaze followed in the 1980s.’

Covid Constitutionals

During this whole lockdown and Covid carry on I’ve taken to meandering around on what I call Covid constitutionals. During lockdown in particular I couldn’t get any further than my bladder would take – so that meant roaming West Swindon. I did feel a bit like I was in the Truman Show…

And one of my recent meanderings took me down Old Shaw Lane past the house that you see below – Shaw House.

Frances Bevan again:

‘The lane that runs between the former Lydiard Millicent parish boundary and the tributary of the River Ray dates back to the Middle Ages.  Building was slow along the thoroughfare known as Shaw Street in 1668 and two hundred years later there were just two farmhouses beside the lane. Shaw Farm, once owned by Viscount Bolingbroke, stood at the south east end and Lower Shaw Farm near the west end.  A further 13 houses and cottages straddled the verges.’

Shaw House, Old Shaw Lane

Social Media Strikes

A mere few days ago, this blog by Frances Bevan appeared on my Twitter stream about one Mary Tuckey. And where did Mary Tuckey live? In none other than Shaw House!

Frances wrote about Mary’s great niece, Jane Helena Tuckey, in her splendid book Struggle and Suffrage in Swindon. It’s a great book – I heartily recommend it to you – and you can find a bit more info on it in this post on Born again Swindonian.

Across the lane from this house is Lower Shaw Farm – another old farmhouse that Frances writes about on her blog.

On and around and about Old Shaw Lane

Remnants of rural life are all around us if we take the time to look. As the photographs above testify.

Indeed, with #LookdownLookaroundLookup that’s the thrust of my new publication, my Born Again Swindonian guide book.

And my last word, and staying on this particular snatch of days gone by and linking to Frances one last more (as my granddaughter says) she has a blog post with the most appropriate name – Rural Remnants