7 reasons to be switched on to Swindon

7 reasons to be switched on to Swindon

12rh August 2017

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7 Reasons to Switch on to Swindon

Hello listeners. Here we are in August already. Aargh! Where is the year going to?

Anyway – here we are with another guest post celebrating our lovely town. This time from Julie Nicholls. Julie lives in Old Walcot and runs two businesses: Body Mind Coaching: http://body-mind-coaching.co.uk and Bilingual Babies: https://www.facebook.com/J.K.Nicholls.BilingualBabies/?fref=ts

What I love about this post is that Julie has picked a range of aspects that go a long way to highlighting what is so great about this place. And who knew that Swindon is a brilliant place to home educate your children?

So here’s Julie’s 7 reasons to be switched on to  Swindon:

‘I didn’t choose Swindon as a place to live. Rather, I chose my ‘husband to be’ and this is where he lived.

When it came to be time for me to settle in England (which I had wanted to do since I was a child) after an 8-month long distance relationship –  and it was long distance back then.The Internet didn’t exist and it took a week for mail to reach Switzerland. So Swindon is where it happened to be.

I was told Swindon was the fastest-growing town in England if not Europe. And though that didn’t appeal to me much, what was welcome was it’s proximity to places I needed to travel to: Blackpool, Belgium and later on Brighton and Devon.

Though I did not choose Swindon as such, I’m happy to call it home – something I never felt in my native Belgium. To be honest I can’t think of anywhere else I could live that gives me what I need in my life right now in the way that Swindon does.

Julie outside the Nuffield Gym

Country lover enjoying town life

I’m not keen on cities. I much prefer being out in the countryside. But as I prefer getting around on my pushbike I don’t want to live out in the middle of nowhere either.  Swindon enables me to do just that. I can cycle to most of the places I want to go. The town centre, Old Town, to my gym in Greenbridge, as well as the green spaces which I will expand on later.  All this is done mostly off the main roads, even if the cycle tracks are not as well signposted as I’d  like. This is a good test of my navigation skills and I always get home though sometimes not the way I was expecting!

1. Swindon: Brilliant business support

When I came to Swindon in 1993 and I could finally start my business, Body Mind Coaching, two things were important then and still are.

Fist was the support I got for my business. It started with Great Western Enterprise and the Chamber of Commerce. This support continued with a whole host of networking groups, especially one I joined more recently, despite knowing about it for almost 10 years: Business Village. In addition  there’s been lots of mostly free business training along the way.

2. Swindon: a green town

I mentioned above that one of the great things about Swindon is access to green spaces. So evening walks around The Lawns and cycling to Coate Water are things we do regularly.

3. Swindon an accepting town

Thinking about it now, I realise that although I was a foreigner, (and still get asked where my accent is from) I have felt accepted by the people, even if I might be considered a little strange. This was something I hadn’t felt growing up in Belgium as I was considered a foreigner there for being British.

4. Swindon: a town with lots happening

It’s been wonderful to find groups in Swindon that support my interests outside of work:

– A choir,

-Full moon Relaxation and other activities at Lower Shaw Farm which I discovered through a lovely health food store Pulse

-The death café, which born again Swindonian had mentioned before and which meets every second Tuesday of the month. The death cafe is run by Sue Holden, a civil celebrant and grief recovery specialist.  

-And to keep in touch with my French, the Anglo-french club de Swindon, the French  Language meet up where Francophiles meet up in Rudi’s bar every other Thursday night for conversations. Then there’s the occasional French film at the arts centre organised by the Swindon film Society for the best in world cinema.

5. Swindon: a great place to raise your family

Swindon has also proved to be a wonderful place to bring up our son.

Thanks to a friend I discovered storytime at many of the libraries, though Central library was the favourite. I got to learn and share some English nursery rhymes with my son as well some stories and other activities. Unbeknown to me at the time, this turned out to be the start my second business, Bilingual Babies ~ Bébés Bilingues.

We make lots of use of all the different play areas and green spaces scattered around the town.  The one in Eastern Avenue in Old Walcot and Cambria Bridge along the canal track in town were regular haunts when my son was little. Now that he is able to cycle, Coate water, Lydiard Park, and Angel Ridge are among his favourites.

https://swindonian.me/category/parks-and-open-spaces/

https://swindonian.me/category/walks-and-cycle-paths/

6. Swindon: great home education network

Last year, we began to consider whether to home educate or not. We were told by a parent in one of the groups that Swindon is one of the best places to home educate as there are loads of activity groups going on where children can socialise and learn all kinds of things depending on their interests. A year on, this has proved to be a great decision and we’re so grateful that Swindon home education has so much to offer.

7. Swindon: offers wide ranging education opportunities

It’s easy to offer a wide education thanks to:

– Art: the museum and art gallery in Old Town which regularly changes its exhibits. And we are looking forward to Swindon Open Studios in September having much enjoyed the Marlborough one this July.

-History and architecture: its railway heritage at the steam Museum and a wonderful tour around the railway village during Heritage weekend.

-Music: Concerts in the Town Gardens and Queen’s park events.

See also: 

The Mechanics’ Institute Trust: https://mechanics-trust.org.uk

Swindon Civic Voice: http://www.swindoncivicvoice.org.uk

Finally: A child’s perspective

On this note, from a child’s perspective, I’ve been told to mention that Swindon is one of the best places to be, because the Swindon buses have names and my son is very pleased that the new company has kept that going.’  Good work Thamesdown Transport: you’ve got a fan! 

Bus King William IV - switch on to swindon

 

 

 

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Discovering Swindon

Discovering Swindon

12th July 2017

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With the Switch on to Swindon initiative in mind I’ve been asking friends and clients of AA Editorial Services to write guest blogs for me sharing their Swindon stories. This time we have Sandra Trusty who is owner of the Fab Gift Boutique, an event/wedding venue stylist and personalised gift shop.

I think it’s fair to say that some people pitch up in Swindon because it turns out to be the only place for miles around where they can afford to buy. This, I think, was the case for Sandra. But don’t quote me on that!

As she describes, she came up against the prejudices about Swindon with which we’re so familiar. But! Sandra has been out and about getting to know Swindon.

She’s discovered Nordic walking on The Lawns – who knew?! Sandra is also a big fan of Fenella Elms’ flow pot. I can’t lie – it gives me the eebie geebies. *Shudders*  Though I can appreciate its technical brilliance.  You can see the flow pot below in the rather fab image she did for the recent Civic Day ‘I care about where I live campaign’ run by Swindon Civic Voice.

I’m rather fond of that Swindon Jubilee clock too I have to say.

Sandra Trusty and images of Swindon

Thanks Sandra for your delightful account of discovering Swindon. It’s just the sort of thing we Born again Swindonians love to hear!

See also:

Carol Aplin, Pink&Green Skincare: Nature on my doorstep – Swindon’s abundance of nature

Jo Rigden,  4Points Leisure: https://swindonian.me/2017/06/29/dragon-boat-racing/ – the charity dragon boat racing event on Coate Water

Tim Perkins, Wild Goose Gear: http://swindonian.me/2017/05/29/kings-farm-wood-walk/ – a walk near Wroughton

Discovering Swindon

‘We moved to Swindon back in 2014.  We had lots of comments about why were moving here, there is nothing in Swindon except the Swindon Outlet Centre, so what were we going to do with ourselves. How wrong were these detractors!

We settled in and went through the painful renovation process. Oh the dust and dirt and many many trips to the local DIY shops.  One consequence of being a frequent visitor to any establishment is that they get to know you.  Because of this we were able to get help with a multitude of issues we faced in our new job as “excited fixer-uppers” Thankfully it’s over now and we can now get time to explore Swindon and its localities.

I love Yoga and have found a fab class located in the Dojo Café.  The class is run by Eunice, a really caring teacher who can make my joints and limbs think  and do wonderful things

At the launch of one of the Swindon Open Studios  I discovered the Swindon Museum and Art Gallery and was transfixed when I saw the display cabinet containing a piece by Fenella Elms.  I could stand and stare at her flow pot for hours, following the ebb and flow of the lines and images and forms the pot creates. My imagination runs riot as I stand and explore the forms of this pot.  It’s totally beautiful and I’m so glad the Swindon museum and art gallery  has acquired it. Pop along to the museum and have a look. See if it floats your boat.

http://www.contemporaryartsociety.org/donated-works/fenella-elms/

I’m amazed that I can just walk into someone’s garden and find street art.  And this is in fact what you can do. In West Swindon, part of the West Swindon Sculpture Trail,  there’s a front garden with a stone carving of ‘Hey Diddle Diddle” on show. You can drive or walk past and admire it.  I’m told you can go right into the garden to get a closer look.  I haven’t done that yet, but one day!

The countryside in and around Swindon is amazing. I love driving around and not being surrounded by concrete. I drove from Swindon to Pewsey recently and discovered some fabulous countryside out there.  We’ve also discovered the Cotswold water park and took a long leisurely Sunday afternoon walk along the towpath and getting sort of lost. 

There’s some excitement in not knowing where you are going to end up.  Then finding your way and joining the dots to link one place to another and realizing you weren’t lost after all. I hope I never become de-sensitised to the beauty around me.

Talking of the outdoors and countryside, I’ve also discovered that Swindon has a Nordic Walking group that meets on a Saturday morning and also twice in the week. I first heard about this sort of walking exercise about 10 years ago but only just had the opportunity to take it up.  I’ve met some lovely people in the group and discovered The Lawns –  a fabulous green space right in the middle of Swindon. It has hills and valleys and lakes, woodlands and wildlife right here in the middle of town. So I Nordic walk up and down and around on a Saturday morning and then retire with the rest of the group for a very restorative coffee/tea/hot chocolate.  We sit outside a coffee shop at the top of Wood Street in Old Town, enjoying our drinks and spend the next five minutes putting the world to rights.

It’s a great way to start a Saturday and leaves me energised for the rest of the day.  The people I’ve met have been open and welcoming and have amazed and delighted me with their kindness and generosity. From my neighbours who welcomed us to the area to total strangers.  There was the lady who bought a teddy for a little girl in the queue behind her and the young man who gave me his phone charger because he had just bought a new phone – I needed a charger and he had one spare.

 I have lots more to discover about Swindon and am looking forward to it.’

Here’s some super pictures from Sandra of her yoga class and her comrades in the Nordic walking:

The website for Nordic walking UK: https://nordicwalking.co.uk

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Dragon Boat Racing at Coate Water

Dragon Boat Racing at Coate Water

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Dragon Boat Racing at Coate Water

Hello readers. Here’s another guest post from a friend of my alter ego, AA Editorial Services. It’s written by Jo who is one half of 4Points Leisure. They’re a super, family run Swindon-based business mad for camping, glamping and festivals. I KNOW – there’s no accounting for some folk eh?! 😉

Jo mentioned that they were going to the dragon boat racing at Coate Water so I said a guest post about would be fab. So here it is!  http://www.swindondragonboat.org.uk   And there’s even a British Dragon Boat Racing Association.  Of course there is!

I have to say it sounds like super fun. And gambling with ice-creams surely gives it an edge?  And I’d no idea it had such a rich history. Interesting stuff. Thanks Jo for this – fascinating.

Dragon Boat Racing

Dragon Boat Racing was entirely new to our family, you can call us very sheltered! We saw the event advertised in Swindon, so we thought we’d pop along. This was part of our tech free Sundays – all in the name really! Every Sunday we now endeavour to find something to do that doesn’t involve tech.  Dragon Boat Racing achieved this small aim!

First a lil history

As you would imagine, it is Chinese in origins, what with the dragons and all, and dates back more than 2000 years. Superstitious Chinese villagers celebrated the 5th day of the 5th lunar month of the Chinese calendar, by racing. Racing was seen to avert misfortune and encourage the rains, which were needed for prosperity.

The Dragon, in China is traditionally a symbol of water, ruling the rivers, seas and clouds. In the 19th century European nations such as Britain and France used military power to control territory and economic privileges, in China. Of course they saw Dragon boat racing as corruptive, leading to gambling and fighting. They sought to suppress it, but dragon boat racing continued to be widely practiced.

Reformers looked to grow Dragon Boat racing, with a view to making it a national sport, and real progress was made from the 1920s to 50s. Then communism hit, and the government decided it represented old feudal customs and banned it in the early 1960s.

Dragon Boat Racing Today

Around 1976, British controlled Hong Kong, began to develop dragon boat racing as a sport. Used primarily to encourage tourism, over the next 10 years, other locations around the world began holding specific festivals in the Hong Kong style.

As the races grew in popularity, several national associations developed, and in 1991 the International Dragon Boat Federation (IDBF)was established in Hong Kong.  The IDBF has since published by-laws, rules & regulations with full technical specifications for the sport, which is now practiced in over 60 countries worldwide.

Dragon boat racing is one of the world’s fastest growing water sports, and is used extensively as a way of raising funds for charity organisations in the UK. Hence the Rotary Club of Swindon Phoenix Dragon Boat Racing Day held in June each year.

Dragon Boat Racing in Swindon

This one day charity event is now in its fifth year, held at Coate Water Country Park in Swindon, the day involves 15 teams. Every team has 16 members paddling and 1 drummer – ehh drumming! The team choose a charity to sponsor, having raised £25 to enter the race.

The first heats involve two teams against one another, and so they race through three heats until the finals. The winner receives a very funky dragon trophy. However we felt that the trophy was just a sideline to the fun and mayhem of the day.

Once the team are in the narrow boat (they’re about 12m long) and settled, it’s down to the co-ordination of paddling. The better co-ordinated you are with each other the faster you’ll go. You would think that was obvious, but when there are 16 of you, and in some cases the drummer thinks he’s Dave Grohl, you get the picture.

As the team Disney Wannabees (dressed as Disney characters) demonstrated. We were treated to the Mad Hatter drumming, and Alice in Wonderland with a beard rowing.  We could be scarred for life!!

2 dragon boats and a dinghy people paddling a dragon boat - 2 dragon boat racing

How do they race?

Both boats row to the end of the lake, nearest the diving platform (long since closed). They turn, as best they can without hitting one another, to face the finish line. As we say, always a good start.

Our starter chap, is balancing in a dingy, which is anchored by a sledgehammer! When he’s happy both boats are facing the right direction, and are level, he’ll sound the horn and off they go.

Paddling like the clappers, drumming like Iron Maiden, steering down the lake towards the chequered flag, the teams are massively competitive.  Racing started at 10am and the finals were held at 3.30. It’s a good full day out if you find a team you want to follow from start to end, or even if you just pitch up with a picnic.

We as a sad  gambling family (such bad examples, I know) made it more interesting by betting ice creams on either the green or red dragon boat would win, and hubcap and I currently owe darling daughter several ice creams! Mmmm…

To give you a further feel for the day, here’s a YouTube video made by Richard Symonds, of the 2014 Swindon Dragon Boat Race.

What else is going on?

The Rotary Club of Swindon Phoenix, had opened up the other side of the lake (the side with the miniature railway and play park) to additional entertainment.  Here they had several charity stalls, tombolas, obligatory tea cup ride and several food outlets, including Arkells Beer wagon (perhaps not at 11am?!). We felt for them in the mizzly rain, after the previous scorcher of a weekend. Yet there were plenty of people about – we even queued for the hook a duck.

Having spent most of our coppers, we headed to the Coate Water Miniature Railway, which I had never, in my 20 years here, ridden. Head over to Born Again Swindonians’ blog about Coate Water here to find out more about this beautiful railway. (She’s right – it IS fabulous.) 

http://coatewaterrailway.wixsite.com/swindon

Coate Water miniature railway

As a day out, Dragon Boat Racing in Swindon is a great event, and you could definitely make a day of it.

As a seafaring family, it introduced us to another water sport. So who knows, 4 Points Leisure may yet take to the waves. Until next time, have fun whatever you’re upto #getoutside.

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Swindon’s abundance of nature

Swindon’s abundance of nature

21st June 2017

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Hello listeners. Continuing with my series of guest posts from friends and AA Editorial Services clients we have this one from Carol Aplin of Pink&Green skincare.

Carol lives in the Kingshill area so often walks and cycles along the canal enjoying the nature to be found there. And in her garden too.

If you’ve not yet taken a trip on Dragonfly down the Wilts & Berks canal put it on your list. It’s a delightful way to pass some time.

NATURE ON MY DOORSTEP

It’s wonderful.  I can be sitting in my conservatory and what should appear but a fox taking a little stroll round my garden.  I see it often.  Where I live, the side of the hill is a woodland.  I am visited by all manner of wildlife.  Sometimes deer can be seen wondering along the roads.  They are quite at home.  At dusk, it is not uncommon to enjoy a badger nuzzling the ground in search of bugs.  (Luckily it hasn’t decided to dig any big holes in my garden.)

Blue tits, long-tailed tits, coal tits, goldfinches, bull finches, firecrests are among an array of feathered visitors.

For exercise, I love going for a cycle.  I’ve never been keen though on tackling busy roads.  Here in Swindon the cycle path network comes to the rescue.  I can potter along the canal and up on to the railway cutting.  My mother lives in Wroughton so I often cycle over to see her.  I’ve worked out that by the time I get my car out and drive there, it’s no quicker than pedal power.

It’s a great opportunity to see more of nature.  Herons, woodpeckers, swans, water voles.  You can even take a leisurely trip in a canal boat if you fancy.

As I leave my house on my bike, I immediately turn down one of the little lanes that run to the canal.  From there it’s very easy to get on to the old railway cutting towards Old Town.  I branch off and head for Wichelstowe if I’m visiting my mum.  Sometimes though, I’ll continue right through to where the old cattle market used to be and head out to Coate Water.  The whole journey doesn’t touch a major road.

I can also do the same in the other direction.  I can get to Waitrose by using the canal.  It’s a very pleasurable way of getting the groceries.

Nature really is on my doorstep.

The first guest post in this series from Tim Perkins of TMP Planning and Wild Goose Gear is here: https://swindonian.me/2017/05/29/kings-farm-wood-walk/

Read about the Wilts and Berks canal and the delightful Dragonfly in this post.

 

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King’s Wood Walk

King’s Wood Walk

28th May 2017

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King’s Farm Wood Walk

With the Switch-on to Swindon initiative kicking off this year I thought it would be good to get some perspectives on Swindon from some other people instead of only mine.

Read my Switch on to Swindon story here: https://swindonian.me/2017/04/11/my-switch-on-to-swindon-story/

I’ve met loads of people when business networking in my AA Editorial Services hat.  Some of them have become clients and/or friends. So I decided to ask them what their favourite things in and around Swindon are.

First up we’ve got Tim Perkins. Being a sucker for punishment Tim has not one but two businesses. I mean really? Why WOULD you?!

One of them is TMP planning – and you can find out more about that by clicking the hyperlink.

The other is Wild Goose Gear and that one concerns itself with all things outdoorsy! ‘We love outdoor exercise and will find any excuse to be out about exploring the countryside on foot, by bike or in the water. From walking the dog, to hiking, running, cycling and open water swimming there are many ways to enjoy the outdoors.’

Wild Goose Gear on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wildgoosegear/?fref=ts

Their newly formed blog:  https://wildgoosegear.wordpress.com

and their Ebay shop: http://stores.ebay.co.uk/wildgoosegear/

So it’s not surprising then that Tim has chosen to talk about the countryside around Swindon. TBH this blog is meant to be concerned with stuff INSIDE Swindon (that comes under SBC) but I’ll stretch the point. Wroughton is close enough for government work.  So now over to Tim:

‘One of the great things about Swindon is the fantastic countryside right on the door step of the town.  Unless you live nearby you may not know about Kings Farm Wood in Wroughton. Yet it’s a fine example of a walk that’s close to the town and easy to access.

Woodpeckers and Wildflowers on the edge of Wroughton in King’s Wood Walk

Signage Kings Wood Walk

Kings Farm Wood is the most accessible of a series of linked nature reserves. They include Clouts Wood, Markham Banks and the Diocese Meadows on the southern edge of Wroughton. They’e all managed by the Wiltshire Wildlife Trust and include contrasting landscapes of meadows, combes and woodland on slopes leading up towards the Marlborough Downs.

Here’s a brief description of the Kings Farm Wood walks which can also be extended to take in the other areas I mentioned.

  1. Start From the Ellendune Centre in Wroughton (by Tesco). There’s a large free car park here if you are driving. Walk out past the library and the War Memorial and turn left.

In a few yards you’ll reach traffic light where you go straight across (past the Co-op on your right). Keep straight on for a few hundred yards until you get to the end of this road. There you’ll see a street sign for Nursery Close pointing right. Follow this road for a few yards and you take a tarmacked footpath on your left between hedges.

pathway Kings Wood Walk

  1. At the end of this cross a road (Badgers Brook) and a small stream and go through the metal gate where you’ll see the information boards for Kings Farm Wood on your right.
  2. Now there are three waymarked routes shown on the board on the left. These are well signposted and easy to follow:

Yellow (0.6 miles) – This is out and back route on a good quality gravel track which is suitable for pushchairs and mobility scooter.

pathway Kings Wood Walk

Red (0.6 miles) – Again this is a short route on more undulating paths.

Blue (1 mile) – The longest route takes you along the gravel path to a metal gate into a field. If you have a dog, note that there may be cattle in this field so keep your dog on a lead.

Across the field you then turn left up a fairly steep slope to the top of the bank and back along a path with some fantastic views of Swindon through meadows and young planted woodland. Weather permitting you will see the distinctive white Nationwide HQ, Christchurch in Old Town and a glimpse of the top of the Murray John Tower Follow the waymarks and you will eventually come back down the hill to the start.

The view from Kings Wood Walk

These three walks are all short and the yellow one in particular is very accessible.

For the more adventurous the walks can easily be extended as there are a network of paths in this area. These link the four areas of Clouts Wood, Diocese Meadows and Markham Banks which can all be explored on a longer walk.  

To get to Clouts Wood simply go through the gate at the end of the gravel path straight across the field and then through the gate opposite. There are several options of paths to the left up the hill and when you get to the top you simply turn right to reach Clouts Wood. If in doubt climb until you reach the fence that marks the boundary with the Science Museum land (old RAF Wroughton) and turn right.

Here’s a link to the Wiltshire Wildlife  leaflet  of this whole area, where it’s located and how to get there Clouts Wood including Kings Farm Wood, Diocese Meadows and Markham Banks

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Dying Matters Awareness Week

Dying Matters Awareness Week

3rd May 2017

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Dying Matters Awareness Week

8th May to 14th May

This blog will be the death of me listeners it really will 😉

Okay. I’ll stop with the puns and introduce this guest post from Sue Holden. Sue is a civil celebrant and grief recovery specialist. Together with Reshma Field who is Swindon Will Writing, she runs a regular death cafe in Swindon. Links to their websites are at the bottom of this post.

Here Sue writes about dying matters awareness week – a nationwide thing doing what it says on the tin.  It makes sense. As Benjamin Franklin apparently said: ‘In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.’

Dying Matters Awareness Week

Stone cross - dying matters awareness week

Does dying matter? Of course, it does.

Then why don’t we talk about it? We plan and discuss other major life events. It doesn’t have to be morbid and it won’t not happen just because you don’t talk about it!

From 8th May to 14th May, events are taking place all over the country with the intention of helping people become more comfortable about planning and talking about death and dying.

Dying Matters is a coalition led by the National Council for Palliative Care. It’s function is to support the implementation of the Department of Health’s ‘End of Life Care’ strategy. To make a ‘good death’ the norm and this year’s theme is ‘What Can You Do?’

Death Cafes make you a ‘legitimate weirdo’ so there will be hundreds running up and down the country for us all to be ‘weird’ together. There’ll also be other events looking at and discussing death and dying.

But who says we are weird? Is it not time to take back responsibility for ourselves instead of leaving it to our children? Make decisions about your end of life care, for how and where you wish to die, for your funeral and funeral ceremony. Have the last laugh. Have the last word! Make every aspect of your life personal and memorable.

About 500,000 people die every year and 70 percent of people would like to die at home, yet 50 percent of people die in hospital. Due to advancements in medicine in hospitals and hospices we can keep people alive for longer, but at what quality?

Many people live to an old age and life expectancy is increasing. This means that many people don’t experience the death of a family member or close friend until they are mid-life themselves.

There used to be some certainties with diseases and accidents but modern medicines have blurred the lines. Society as a whole has never been less exposed to death. As a result, we’ve become afraid of what we don’t know, can’t see and haven’t experienced. Fear of the unknown means that people sometimes avoid those who are ill and dying and feel unable to support them. It also means that if relatives of a loved one don’t know a persons’ preferences, they may make decisions about care that the dying person doesn’t want. When the inevitable happens, those who are left behind often have to make decisions in a hurry when they’re emotionally distraught and least able to make them. It can also be comforting to those near death to know that their passing will not add any extra stress and pain if their final wishes are known and will be carried out.

Terrorism and wars bring death closer to us, so we cannot go on ignoring it. In some cultures, and countries death through fights, stabbings, gun crime, famine, disease etc. can be ‘normal’. Does this make it easier to talk about? Yes, it can do. Grief can be a catalyst to talk. We don’t know when we’re going to die. When we’re young we think it will be never!

Yet, we often live better when we know and accept that we’re going to die and embrace our mortality. Be present, enjoy what you do, experiment, have no regrets.

Start to talk about death and dying before grief becomes your catalyst by checking in at an event near you.

Boat funeral - dying matters awareness week

In Swindon, Sue Holden will be running her regular Death Cafe at the Village Hotel (de Vere) at Shaw Leisure Park SN5 7DW on Tuesday 9th May from 7.00pm to 8.30pm. Admission is FREE.

The Prospect Hospice will also be running similar events throughout the week. Find out more about that here: http://www.prospect-hospice.net/Events/dying-matters-awareness-week.aspx

In Trowbridge, at the Town Hall, people can pop in and ‘Ask the Undertaker’, join a Death Café for coffee and cakes, watch a couple of films and find out about writing a will, powers of attorney, planning your funeral, writing your ceremony and many other interesting subjects.

If you would like further information about events in Swindon and Wiltshire please contact Sue on 07941273589 or via email: susan.cfc.holden@gmail.com

http://celebrant-services.co.uk/about-us/

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Reshma Field and Swindon Will Writing:

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