Limoncello Italian Liqueur

Limoncello Italian Liqueur - seen here in DaPaolo's in Swindon
Limoncello Italian Liqueur – seen here in DaPaolo’s deli in Swindon

Only a few days ago I covered Jamaican rum punch in this post here. Now we’re looking at Limoncello. So from the Caribbean to Capri we go! Clink your glasses and we’re off!

I’m not going to lie, I’m not keen on this stuff at all. A shot of grappa I’m partial to but not Limoncello Italian liqueur. Anyway, the bottles of the yellow, lemony stuff you see here are on the shelves in DaPaolo’s deli on Commercial Road in Swindon town centre. But I’m sure you’d get it in any of the many Italian eateries dotted around Swindon.

What is Limoncello then?

The website A Couple of Cooks tells all.

Limoncello – pronounced Lee-moan-cheh-lo – is a lemon liqueur. It’s made from lemon zest, sugar and a neutral alcohol – most often vodka, but it can be grappa or rectified spirit (highly concentrated ethanol). After Campari ( and I can’t stand that either) it’s the second most popular liqueur in Italy.

The drink carries strong associations with the Amalfi coast and the island of Capri. But it’s made all over Italy by producers large and small.

So how do you drink it? Well, diners tend to enjoy it after a meal, neat and chilled, as a digestif or digestivo.

The origin story of the liqueur is, it seems, open to debate, but it originated in the early 1900s. According to ‘A couple of cooks’, explain that the Capris natives claim the recipe stems from a woman by the name of Maria Antonia Faraceha. It seems that her grandnephew trademarked the Limoncello term in 1988. All of that said, the city of Sorrento has differing origin stories. Whatever the ins and outs of all that, it’s a common European drink.


For more Swindon in 50 Drinks posts go here: https://swindonian.me/category/eating-drinking-coffee-etc/swindon-in-50-drinks/

I’m on 21 so far – what will come next? Why not come on the journey with me?
You never know what you’ll find and learn!