żywiec Polish Pilsner Beer
Recent weeks have seen me make two visits to Do Syta (AKA the Bear Restaurant) in the Polish Club in Park South. Thus arises an opportunity for a Swindon in 50 Drinks post! This time we raise a glass to żywiec Polish pilsner beer.

żywiec Polish Pilsner Beer

The Żywiec Brewery 

According to that font of all knowledge, sometimes, Wikipedia – the Żywiec Brewery (pronounced Zhi-vietzPolish pronunciation: [ˈʐɨvjɛt͡s]) is one of the largest breweries and beer producers in Poland.

Founded in 1856 in the town of Żywiec, the brewery manufactures pale lager with a 5.6% alcohol volume. Grupa Żywiec S.A. consists of five main breweries:
1. Żywiec Brewery
2.  Elbrewery
3. Leżajsk
4. Warka Brewery and
6. Browar Namysłów.


Currently, the Dutch Heineken Group (Heineken International Beheer B.V.), with a 65% shareholding, has control over its major operations. Harbin B.V. has 35% shareholding. The brewery has the capacity of producing 5 million hls a year, making it the largest brewery in Grupa Żywiec.

About the brewery

The brewery began life in 1856 in the eponymous town – then part of Austrian Poland. The Habsburg Imperial family owned it until the post-WWII Communist government of Poland confiscated it. The beginning of the 1990s saw a court case started by the descendants of the original owners. It seems they sued the Polish government for compensation to the tune of 77 million dollars and rights to use the Habsburg family name and coat of arms for marketing purposes. There followed an out-of-court settlement on undisclosed terms in December 2005.

The Żywiec Brewery began distribution to other towns of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1913. In the 1990s, Heineken acquired and modernized Żywiec.

Tasting notes

According to Beer Advocate, Zywiec carries a bright, pale gold, transparent countenance. The beer smells of dry grasses, green apples and corn syrup – on this I wouldn’t know as I have no sense of smell. Now, I DO smell but that’s another thing altogether!

Anyway, Beer Advocate describes the taste thus: Sweet, and malty with green apple tartness and grassy flavours dominating it. As to its feel: light and dry, with a round softness that plays at the front and sides of the tongue. 

So there you have it – a pleasant pilsner with which to wash down the schniztel or the perogi in Do Syta.

Do Syta – The Bear Restaurant

Okay, so a few words about the charming Do Syta, otherwise known as the Bear Restuarant in the Polish Club.

Do Syta Swindon Polish Club
Location of Do Syta Swindon

I’ve enjoyed two lovely occasions in this delightful little place, with fellow Hobnob Press author, David Bradshaw. As you can see in the images below we did book swaps.

David Bradshaw and Angela Atkinson with Swimming without Mangos and a Born Again Swindonians guide book
David Bradshaw and Angela Atkinson with Swimming without Mangos and a Born Again Swindonians guide book
David Bradshaw and Angela Atkinson with respective copies of Growing up Barefoot and Swindon in 50 Buildings
David Bradshaw and Angela Atkinson with respective copies of Growing up Barefoot and Swindon in 50 Buildings

Swimming without mangoes

From the Hobnob Press website:

Second volume of memoirs by a Montserrat-born author who grew up in Swindon during the 1960s and 1970s, and went on to become a successful lawyer and law lecturer. This volume describes his arrival at the age of 8 in the Wiltshire railways town, how he survived (‘swam for his life’) in unfamiliar surroundings, and how he flourished in his studies, sports and friendships at St Joseph’s School in Swindon.

A bit about the food

It’s good and the portions are huge. The pierogi are super scrummy, the chips are delicious and the schnitzel is not half bad. I’ve not yet tried the soups but they look fabulous too so must get round to that!